Prenatal Yoga: More Challenging Than I Thought

I'm well into my 2nd trimester and resumed yoga yesterday. I had missed it so much and, because I am planning a natural birth, I am confident yoga will help me maintain my core strength and also flexibility - thus making the birth a bit easier. (if that is even possible haha)

Where do I do yoga? Well, as a Veteran I am always up for the free Veteran classes offered in the area. It's one of the perks of being a Vet. The downfall is that a lot of instructors are uncomfortable and unfamiliar with prenatal yoga so they don't want you attending. I can understand some being fearful of causing injury due to lack of familiarity or knowledge and I respect their request. Thankfully I have found TWO classes who will let me join -- even if I am a pregger!

It has been a few months since I've done yoga. My honey and I were traveling in Italy for about a month and shortly after is when we found out we were pregnant. Since finding out, there has been no yoga ... until yesterday! Yoga is not like riding a bike. It's easy to tell how much the body misses just a few weeks of yoga - let alone a few months!

Twists, turns and some compression moves are a no go. But let me just tell you how fantastic the Warrior positions felt! I mean, it was like I reconnected with myself once again. I could feel my little baby moving with me. Maybe she was doing her own yoga?! (haha That's a cartoon image I'd like to see: Mom & baby in womb doing Warrior 2 simultaneously.) Yes, my little Warrior Princess definitely loved the yoga with me.

Stretching, breathing, relaxing ... these things are so important to everyone but I think it's even more important during pregnancy.

So, to all the moms & moms-to-be and all the Warrior Princes & Princesses in womb ... Namaste.


Information courtesy of the Mayo Clinic about Prenatal Yoga


Prenatal yoga can be a great way to prepare for childbirth. Find out if this type of prenatal exercise is right for you. (By Mayo Clinic staff)

What are the benefits of prenatal yoga?

  • Improve sleep
  • Reduce stress and anxiety
  • Increase the strength, flexibility and endurance of muscles needed for childbirth
  • Decrease lower back pain, nausea, carpal tunnel syndrome, headaches and shortness of breath
  • Decrease the risk of preterm labor, pregnancy-induced hypertension and intrauterine growth restriction — a condition that slows a baby's growth
What happens during a typical prenatal yoga class?


  • Breathing. You'll be encouraged to focus on breathing in and out slowly and deeply through the nose. You may also practice different breathing techniques and making deep sounds, such as humming or grunting. Prenatal yoga breathing techniques may help you reduce or manage shortness of breath during pregnancy and work through contractions during labor.
  • Gentle stretching. You'll be encouraged to gently move different areas of your body, such as your neck and arms, through their full range of motion.
  • Postures. While standing, sitting or lying on the ground, you'll gently move your body into different positions aimed at developing your strength, flexibility and balance. Props — such as blankets, cushions and belts — may be used to provide support and comfort. You'll also continue to focus on your breathing.
  • Cool down. At the end of each prenatal yoga class, you'll relax your muscles and restore your resting heart rate and breathing rhythm. You'll be encouraged to sit down and gently stretch different parts of your body.
  • Relaxation. You may be encouraged to listen to your own breathing, pay close attention to sensations, thoughts and emotions, or repeat a mantra or word to bring about a state of self-awareness and inner calm.
If you're pregnant and looking for ways to relax or stay fit, you may be considering prenatal yoga. Good for you! But did you know that prenatal yoga may also help you prepare for labor and promote your baby's health? Before you start prenatal yoga, understand the range of possible benefits, as well as what a typical class entails and important safety tips.


Much like other types of childbirth-preparation classes, prenatal yoga is a multifaceted approach to exercise that encourages stretching, mental centering and focused breathing. Research suggests that prenatal yoga is safe and can have many benefits for pregnant women and their babies. For example, studies have suggested that prenatal yoga can:
Prenatal yoga can also help you meet and bond with other pregnant women and prepare for the stress of being a new parent.
A typical prenatal yoga class may involve:


  • Breathing. You'll be encouraged to focus on breathing in and out slowly and deeply through the nose. You may also practice different breathing techniques and making deep sounds, such as humming or grunting. Prenatal yoga breathing techniques may help you reduce or manage shortness of breath during pregnancy and work through contractions during labor.
  • Gentle stretching. You'll be encouraged to gently move different areas of your body, such as your neck and arms, through their full range of motion.
  • Postures. While standing, sitting or lying on the ground, you'll gently move your body into different positions aimed at developing your strength, flexibility and balance. Props — such as blankets, cushions and belts — may be used to provide support and comfort. You'll also continue to focus on your breathing.
  • Cool down. At the end of each prenatal yoga class, you'll relax your muscles and restore your resting heart rate and breathing rhythm. You'll be encouraged to sit down and gently stretch different parts of your body.
  • Relaxation. You may be encouraged to listen to your own breathing, pay close attention to sensations, thoughts and emotions, or repeat a mantra or word to bring about a state of self-awareness and inner calm.


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